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Chip shops in Rishton can be found under the building section of this web site, this page is more to reflect a way of life......

As a child, one of the things that I remember is going to our local chippie on a Friday night with a stack of dishes in my hand.

The dishes would be passed over the counter and placed in the warmer, or on top of it until it was my turn to be served! If this seems strange to you so far, then believe me, think of a time with no polystyrene trays, and no plastic forks, and you will begin to get an idea!

A chip shop a few years ago meant exactly that! Chips, fish, peas and gravy were about all you got back then! Later, pies and puddings would arrive, and even later sausages and burgers, but this is a modern thing.

If you were lucky you could get a dab, but not many chippies sold these.

When your turn finally came at the counter the dishes were brought out, and each dish given an order to be filled with;

Fish chips and peas, Upside down mixtures were popular, and a decent chippie would still serve this without raising an eyebrow, unfortunately, with the influx of oriental people buying up the chip shops in the area they are not aware of what an upside down mixture is and a lengthy explanation is now required.

Just a dish of chips and gravy, all with a good lashing of salt and vinegar, and of course, all wrapped in proper newspaper. No one cared about the ink getting on your food in them days! Now the paper has to be blank, and the paper is usually covering a polystyrene tray.

If you were feeling a bit peckish in the evening while you were out playing a quick call in the chippie and you would be walking away with a free bag of scraps, or if you had a couple of bob in your pocket, a portion of chips covered with scraps to fill you up!

The fish was the only thing that was covered in batter, and was usually either delivered fresh from Fleetwood fish market, or the owner would travel to Fleetwood to collect it himself early in a morning.

As time progressed fish could be sought locally from the local fish mongers. The fish was always cod, caught fresh from the Irish sea, and seemed to be twice the size of fish which is served in the chip shops now!

More recently, in October 1995, Bite-sized battered Mars bars have been frying nightly at Chan's chippy in High Street. Husband and wife David and Jade Ng added choccy bar chow to the menu about a month ago.

David said: "We have had a mixed reaction but it's not as disgusting as it sounds. In fact they are quite delicious. It's an alternative to the usual banana fritter or pineapple fritter."

The craze is believed to have started in Scotland where they batter just about anything including meat pies and pizzas!

Terminology

Upside Down Mixture - Chips and peas served with the peas on top of the chips.

Batter - A mixture of flour and water, sometimes with special ingredients, that the fish is dipped in before being thrown in the friar.

Dab - Slice of potato dipped in batter and deep fried.

Scraps - These are the bits of batter that drip off the fish as it is being put in the pan. They are scooped out at regular intervals and put to one side. They used to be kept in a corner of the warmer, but these days they are usually thrown in a bucket ready for throwing away.

References

Lancashire evening Telegraph, 10th October 1995.