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Cobbled Norfolk Street in July 2001.

Cobbles are also known as Setts. They are lumps of stone, or granite shaped into squares. The top side of the cobble is slightly rounded, for what reason I do not know, possibly to stop water settling on the stone. Cobbles can be found in most of Rishtons back street, and are still visible on some of the smaller streets in the town.

Before the introduction of tarmac at the turn of the century, all of Rishtons streets were made up of cobbles. When road works are carried out the cobbles are still found under the tarmac.

There are still several streets laid with cobbles, most the streets running West off Harwood Road still show their cobbles, and the top of Walmsley Street is also still cobbled.

Several people have commented about the traffic calming measures that appeared at the start of the millennium years. A lot of people say that if they want to slow traffic down on the roads, simple take up the tarmac!

Cobbles on Walmsey Street in May 2001.

A lot of streets, not just in Rishton but around the whole of Lancashire, still have the cobbles under the tarmac. This is plainly visible every time road works are carried out on the road, but every road works doesn't relay the cobbles after.

I think people have a point! The local authorities spend thousand and thousands of pounds on these schemes, which in the main seem to cause more accidents, not less, and the authorities could make money selling the old tarmac off the top of the roads!

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